Yayoi Kusama

All posts tagged Yayoi Kusama

artnet: 5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life

by Alexandra_Munroe on September 10, 2018

5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life


Sarah Cascone

5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life

The new documentary illuminates Kusama’s creative genius and great ambition, as well as her struggles, over the years.

Yayoi Kusama in the Orez Gallery in the Hague, Netherlands (1965) in Kusama – Infinity, directed by Heather Lenz. Photo by Harrie Verstappen, courtesy Magnolia Pictures.
Yayoi Kusama in the Orez Gallery in the Hague, Netherlands (1965) in Kusama – Infinity, directed by Heather Lenz. Photo by Harrie Verstappen, courtesy Magnolia Pictures.

Today, Yayoi Kusama is an art-world superstar, with museum-goers around the world lining up for hours for the chance to take photographs of—and with—her mirrored Infinity Rooms and polka-dotted pumpkins. And yet, the Japanese artist has lived in a mental hospital since the 1970s, suggesting an unseen dark side to her colorful universe. As a new documentary reveals, the road to success was a long and winding one that tested the artist’s drive, resiliency, and, ultimately, her sanity.

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Alexandra_Munroeartnet: 5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life

Go Inside the World of Asian Art in Alexandra Munroe’s ‘Eyes on Fire’

by Alexandra_Munroe on August 20, 2018

originally aired live on Cheddar.com
https://cheddar.com/videos/go-inside-the-world-of-asian-art-in-alexandra-munroes-eyes-on-fire
August 20, 2018

American interest in Asian art is at an all-time high after Yayoi Kusama’s hit ‘Infinity Mirrors’ exhibition. Guggenheim Museum Senior Curator Alexandra Munroe explores the diverse world of Asian Art in her video series ‘Eyes on Fire.’

 

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Alexandra_MunroeGo Inside the World of Asian Art in Alexandra Munroe’s ‘Eyes on Fire’

Eyes on Fire: Reimagining Kusama

by Alexandra_Munroe on October 14, 2016

The first time I saw Yayoi Kusama’s works was in 1986 at Tokyo’s Fuji TV Gallery.  I had heard all about her 1960s New York period from other artists: how Donald Judd thought highly of her white Infinity Nets paintings, how she used to show up at openings wearing a Mylar kimono, and how her Happenings were every bit as important in the history of performance art as Carolee Schneeman’s Meat Joy. 

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Alexandra_MunroeEyes on Fire: Reimagining Kusama

This Is How Iconic Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama Was Reintroduced to the West

by Alexandra_Munroe on October 13, 2016

By Estelle Tang
Originally published on ELLE.com

Beloved of art tastemakers, the fashion world, and casual museum Instagrammers, Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is now a universal figure of inspiration and intrigue.

Eyes on Fire: Reimagining Kusama from Alexandra Munroe on Vimeo.

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Alexandra_MunroeThis Is How Iconic Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama Was Reintroduced to the West

Japanese Art after 1945 Scream Against the Sky : VIDEO

by Alexandra_Munroe on September 13, 2016

It was 1990, and I was making a stop to see the new Yokohama Museum of Art on my regular rounds as an American curator of Japanese art. To my surprise, I was ushered into the vast office of the Director General and invited, point blank, to propose an exhibition for the museum like my recent Yayoi Kusama retrospective in New York. I paused. I was deep into researching a history of postwar Japanese avant-garde art, a topic so unknown in the west that I was rejected from graduate schools in art history before landing in the East Asian history department at NYU. The new museum, designed by Kenzo Tange, was advertised as the largest space for contemporary art in Japan. “I have an idea,” I heard myself saying. “How about a survey of the Japanese avant-garde, from Gutai to Dumb Type?”  Taro Amano, who, in his early thirties, was a little older than me, jumped ahead of his elders with a prophetic, “Subarashii.  Let’s do it.”  I saw the galleries in my mind’s eye. “I would just like to be sure of one thing,” I said. “We will need to use the entire museum.”

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Alexandra_MunroeJapanese Art after 1945 Scream Against the Sky : VIDEO