Japanese art

All posts tagged Japanese art

artnet: 5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life

by Alexandra_Munroe on September 10, 2018

5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life


Sarah Cascone

5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life

The new documentary illuminates Kusama’s creative genius and great ambition, as well as her struggles, over the years.

Yayoi Kusama in the Orez Gallery in the Hague, Netherlands (1965) in Kusama – Infinity, directed by Heather Lenz. Photo by Harrie Verstappen, courtesy Magnolia Pictures.
Yayoi Kusama in the Orez Gallery in the Hague, Netherlands (1965) in Kusama – Infinity, directed by Heather Lenz. Photo by Harrie Verstappen, courtesy Magnolia Pictures.

Today, Yayoi Kusama is an art-world superstar, with museum-goers around the world lining up for hours for the chance to take photographs of—and with—her mirrored Infinity Rooms and polka-dotted pumpkins. And yet, the Japanese artist has lived in a mental hospital since the 1970s, suggesting an unseen dark side to her colorful universe. As a new documentary reveals, the road to success was a long and winding one that tested the artist’s drive, resiliency, and, ultimately, her sanity.

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Alexandra_Munroeartnet: 5 Things We Learned About Yayoi Kusama From the New Documentary About Her Extraordinary Life

PoNJA-GenKon in Partnership with CTCA Launches the “Online Bibliography of Post-1945 Japanese Art” Project

by Alexandra_Munroe on March 15, 2018

Press Release

PoNJA-GenKon in Partnership with CTCA Launches the “Online Bibliography of Post-1945 Japanese Art” Project

——March 15, 2018

PoNJA-GenKon is pleased to announce the launch of a project to create an “Online Bibliography of Post-1945 Japanese Art” to mark its 15th anniversary, in partnership with CTCA (The Centre for Transnational Cultural Analysis) at Carleton University, Ottawa.

The online bibliography created by PoNJA-GenKon and hosted by CTCA will consist of searchable bibliographic items on post-1945 Japanese art history, primarily in English and possibly other Western languages. It will also include one or more PDF files listing select entries that will serve as a study guide, a research reference, and other such introductory and advanced citation tools. The expected completion date is 2019.

The project is funded by Alexandra Munroe through a donation of her 2017 Japan Foundation Award prize money.

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Alexandra_MunroePoNJA-GenKon in Partnership with CTCA Launches the “Online Bibliography of Post-1945 Japanese Art” Project

Japanorama: Five Decades of Japanese Art from Metabolism to the Post-Human

by Alexandra_Munroe on February 20, 2018

originally published at Frieze.com
https://frieze.com/article/japanorama-five-decades-japanese-art-metabolism-post-human

At the Centre Pompidou-Metz, the past year has seen the most extensive survey of contemporary Japanese art outside of the country in 17 years

 

‘Japanorama – A New Vision on Art since 1970’ marks the final exhibition in Centre Pompidou-Metz’s year-long Japanese season (September 2017 – May 2018). Curated by Yuko Hasegawa, Artistic Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, it’s the most extensive survey exhibition of contemporary Japanese art outside of Japan since Alexandra Munroe’s ‘Japanese Art After 1945: Scream Against the Sky’ – which toured to The Yokohama Museum of Art, Yokohama, The Guggenheim, New York, and San Francisco MoMA in 1994 – and Jonathan Watkins’ ‘Facts of Life: Contemporary Japanese Art’ at the Hayward Gallery in London in 2001. This exhibition, however, consciously follows on from Centre Pompidou’s own 1986 show ‘The Avant-Garde Arts of Japan 1910-70’, which examined Japanese modernity chiefly in relation to the Western avant-garde.

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Alexandra_MunroeJapanorama: Five Decades of Japanese Art from Metabolism to the Post-Human

PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature

by Alexandra_Munroe on April 20, 2017

Celebrating literature and free expression with the most exciting writers from around the world. Tuesday, May 2nd, 7pm-9pm.

Rokudenashiko, a feminist Japanese manga artist making colorful models of her vagina, Ali Asgar, an LGBTQ+ Bangladeshi performance artist, and revolutionary Iranian singer-songwriter Mohsen Namjoo, the “Bob Dylan of Iran” (New York Times), will explore politics, gender and identity, and discuss their experiences facing persecution for their creative expression. The conversation will be moderated by Alexandra Munroe, Guggenheim Senior Curator for Asian Art.

Tuesday, May 2nd, 7pm-9pm
Dixon Place
161 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Tickets available: https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10147224

Explore PEN World Voices: http://worldvoices.pen.org/

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[Premiere] How a ‘Scream’ of Post-War Japanese Art Pioneered Modernism

by Alexandra_Munroe on October 29, 2016

By DJ Pangburn
Originally published on VICE: Creators Project

These days, Japanese artists like Yayoi Kusama and Takashi Murakami pull big crowds and even bigger price tags, but it wasn’t always so. Vibrant though it was, the Japanese avant-garde was relatively unknown to Western audiences for most of the 20th century. This began to change in 1996 when scholar and author Alexandra Munroe, Senior Curator of Global Arts at the Guggenheim Museum, debuted the exhibition Scream Against the Sky, which featured work by Murakami, Lee Ufan, Cai Guo-Qiang, and others.

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Alexandra_Munroe[Premiere] How a ‘Scream’ of Post-War Japanese Art Pioneered Modernism