Chinese Art

All posts tagged Chinese Art

The Economist: How China’s artists made sense of their country

by Alexandra_Munroe on November 8, 2017

Chinese takeaway
Originally published in The Economist
| NEW YORK

A new exhibition focuses on art that was made in or inspired by China between 1989 and 2008

HANGING from the ceiling of the magnificent rotunda that Frank Lloyd Wright created for the Guggenheim Museum in 1959 is an undulating black dragon. Twenty-six metres (85 feet) long, it is made almost entirely of the inner tubes of bicycles. Its head is a sculptural confection of broken cycles, its rear a writhing excrescence of black rubber loops. The visual etymology is obviously and satisfyingly Chinese. Then you notice hundreds of tiny black cars crawling all over its underbelly, like head lice on a schoolchild—symbolic of the moment when the country, in the headlong pursuit of economic growth, swerved from pedal power to petroleum.

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Alexandra_MunroeThe Economist: How China’s artists made sense of their country

supchina: 10 Can’t-Miss Artworks At The Guggenheim’s ‘Art And China After 1989: Theater Of The World’

by Alexandra_Munroe on October 27, 2017

originally published on supchina.com
0
by AMI LI

“Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World,” on right now at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, is an art show of massive proportions. Taking up the entire rotunda and two additional galleries of the landmark Frank Gehry building, it’s easy to become overwhelmed when there’s a 65-foot dragon soaring above your head.

But between the crowds and the mythical beasts, here are 10 pieces worth a second (or seventh) glance as you make your way through two decades’ worth of Chinese contemporary art.

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Alexandra_Munroesupchina: 10 Can’t-Miss Artworks At The Guggenheim’s ‘Art And China After 1989: Theater Of The World’

The Guggenheim’s Alexandra Munroe on Why ‘The Theater of the World’ Was Intended to Be Brutal

by Alexandra_Munroe on September 26, 2017

Originally published: artnet.com

The Guggenheim’s Alexandra Munroe on Why ‘The Theater of the World’ Was Intended to Be Brutal

The curator explains the origins of the exhibition and the thinking behind its most controversial elements.
Andrew Goldstein

When it comes to the contemporary art of Asia, with all its multifaceted history and geopolitical sprawl, there are few more accomplished curators in America than Alexandra Munroe. A native New Yorker who was partly raised in Japan and studied at a monastic compound in Kyoto, Munroe became a star after organizing “Japanese Art After 1945: Scream Against the Sky” for the Yokohama Museum of Art in 1994, which later traveled to the United States and did much to frame how postwar Japanese art is viewed in the country.

Now well ensconced at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum as its Samsung Senior Curator of Asian Art, Munroe is trying to repeat that feat with recent Chinese art history, working with two co-curators—the widely respected experts Hou Hanru and Phillip Tinari—to chart the arc of conceptual art in China between 1989 and 2008 in “Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World.

Now, a week before it opens to the public, the show is already proving problematic.

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Alexandra_MunroeThe Guggenheim’s Alexandra Munroe on Why ‘The Theater of the World’ Was Intended to Be Brutal

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Staff News: Gu Dexin Curated by Alexandra Munroe

by Alexandra_Munroe on November 16, 2016

By Nicholas Forrest
Originally published on Blouinartinfo.com

Since its first edition in 2009, Abu Dhabi Art has established itself as one of the region’s – and the world’s – most dynamic and innovative art fairs. Although relatively small in size compared to its international counterparts, Abu Dhabi Art punches well above its weight, attracting top galleries from around the world.

Organized by the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi), Abu Dhabi Art returns for its 8th edition in 2016 from November 16-19 at Manarat Al Saadiyat with a lineup of 40 galleries from 20 countries, exhibiting within the four different sectors of the fair: Modern & Contemporary, Bidaya, Beyond, and Gateway.

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Alexandra_MunroeSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum Staff News: Gu Dexin Curated by Alexandra Munroe